Low Carb Friends  
Netrition.com - Tools - Faces - Recipes - Home


Go Back   Low Carb Friends > Main Lowcarb Lobby
Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Forum Jump
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-01-2017, 09:38 AM   #1
clackley
Chatty Cathy
 
clackley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 13,498
Gallery: clackley
WOE: N.K.=vlc/moderate protein/high fat
Start Date: Restart Oct 18 2009
Fasting Insulin

I may have posted about this before so forgive me the repetition if I have....

I had my fasting insulin tested at my last annual labs and wonder if anyone else has done so.

Since then, I have read as much on the subject as I could find (including Joseph Krafts work) but still am confused on it. The most confusing thing to me is that it seems that fasting insulin is quite 'volatile' and can change with little or no food input. Stress for instance can raise blood glucose and therefore insulin.

Any thoughts?
__________________
Cathy
Original start - Feb. 2000 180/125

"The energy content of food (calories) matters, but it is less important than the metabolic effect of food on our body." Dr. P. Attia
“Eat animals. Mostly fat. Enjoy!
"I resist insulin" Hyperlipid
We are butter together!
clackley is offline   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old 06-01-2017, 02:01 PM   #2
Ronnie51
Major LCF Poster!
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 2,056
Gallery: Ronnie51
I'll tell you what I know about fasting insulin from reading. First, the normal range of fasting insulin with the major labs like LabCorp is much too high; normal goes up to something like 25. But based on my doctor and articles I've read, anything over 9 or 10 points to insulin resistance or metabolic syndrome. You should not have that much insulin circulating in your blood if you haven't eaten for 12 hours. That much insulin constantly in your bloodstream makes it almost impossible to lose weight. DH has fasting insulin of around 17; the lab says it's normal but our doctor says no. He is overweight, and his A1c is prediabetic as is his fasting glucose (104). The doctor prescribed Metformin for him which really worked to lower his fasting insulin and glucose and his A1c. He even lost a few pounds. But the Metformin upsets his stomach so he stopped taking it, the result being he's gained even more weight, his fasting insulin is back in the teens, his fasting glucose is over 100 again and his A1c is prediabetic. I'm not sure what lowers fasting insulin except for Metformin. I've read that very low carb diets can actually cause insulin resistance. The supplement, Berberine, may be as effective as Metformin based on studies which showed that Berberine acts in the same manner as Metformin in the body. As far as fasting insulin being volatile, I would say that your body releases insulin in response to your liver releasing glucose. So when there's glucose in your blood, the body releases insulin to get that glucose into the cells for energy instead of floating around in your bloodstream. So, if you have a higher fasting glucose, your fasting insulin probably responds in kind. That's about all I know, again, from reading and my doctor. BTW, my fasting insulin is normal (3), my fasting glucose is normal (92), but my A1c is prediabetic (5.7). Doctor's not sure what's happening with me.
Ronnie51 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2017, 02:34 PM   #3
battler
Senior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 357
Gallery: battler
Quote:
Originally Posted by clackley View Post
I may have posted about this before so forgive me the repetition if I have....

I had my fasting insulin tested at my last annual labs and wonder if anyone else has done so.

Since then, I have read as much on the subject as I could find (including Joseph Krafts work) but still am confused on it. The most confusing thing to me is that it seems that fasting insulin is quite 'volatile' and can change with little or no food input. Stress for instance can raise blood glucose and therefore insulin.

Any thoughts?
Yes. I posted on indoor blue light not that long ago. Jack Kruse seems to the most vocal on this issue. He believes its the reason many paleo and low carb folk can only get so far with their weight, and why the guy from 'livin low carb' has gained a lot of weight. He believes circadian biology also plays a major part, as well as a lack of sunlight. I personally believe there is something in it and have put in place some of his protocols and have fallen below goal now and can actually see a change in body shape.
battler is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2017, 03:59 PM   #4
Rosebud
Senior LCF Member
 
Rosebud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: IL
Posts: 370
Gallery: Rosebud
WOE: Ketogenic
Start Date: 1/25/17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronnie51 View Post
I'll tell you what I know about fasting insulin from reading. First, the normal range of fasting insulin with the major labs like LabCorp is much too high; normal goes up to something like 25. But based on my doctor and articles I've read, anything over 9 or 10 points to insulin resistance or metabolic syndrome. You should not have that much insulin circulating in your blood if you haven't eaten for 12 hours. That much insulin constantly in your bloodstream makes it almost impossible to lose weight. DH has fasting insulin of around 17; the lab says it's normal but our doctor says no. He is overweight, and his A1c is prediabetic as is his fasting glucose (104). The doctor prescribed Metformin for him which really worked to lower his fasting insulin and glucose and his A1c. He even lost a few pounds. But the Metformin upsets his stomach so he stopped taking it, the result being he's gained even more weight, his fasting insulin is back in the teens, his fasting glucose is over 100 again and his A1c is prediabetic. I'm not sure what lowers fasting insulin except for Metformin. I've read that very low carb diets can actually cause insulin resistance. The supplement, Berberine, may be as effective as Metformin based on studies which showed that Berberine acts in the same manner as Metformin in the body. As far as fasting insulin being volatile, I would say that your body releases insulin in response to your liver releasing glucose. So when there's glucose in your blood, the body releases insulin to get that glucose into the cells for energy instead of floating around in your bloodstream. So, if you have a higher fasting glucose, your fasting insulin probably responds in kind. That's about all I know, again, from reading and my doctor. BTW, my fasting insulin is normal (3), my fasting glucose is normal (92), but my A1c is prediabetic (5.7). Doctor's not sure what's happening with me.
Ronnie51 - was your fasting insulin, fasting glucose and A1c done from the same draw? The reason I ask is if they were done in the same draw, your FI & FG indicate you are insulin sensitive whereas your A1c is prediabetic is an indication of insulin resistance, which is quite the opposite. I plugged your FI & FG numbers into the HOMA-IR calculator at The Blood Code.
Rosebud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2017, 04:32 PM   #5
Rosebud
Senior LCF Member
 
Rosebud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: IL
Posts: 370
Gallery: Rosebud
WOE: Ketogenic
Start Date: 1/25/17
Forgot to address very low carb diets causing insulin resistance; this is normal and what the body should do. This is referred to as physiological insulin resistance vs pathological insulin resistance as in the case of prediabetics and diabetics. Below is an excerpt that would explain it more:

"After going low carb, your muscle tissue becomes insulin resistant in order to preserve serum glucose availability for the brain. If your muscle tissue did not do this, reduced availability of glucose in the serum could (theoretically) put you in dire straights if your brain can’t meet minimal demand for glucose. (Mind you, even on a zero carb diet you can meet all your glucose requirements via gluconeogenesis. The point is, your body needs a way to tell your muscle mass to stop taking all the glucose it makes. This is that way.)

Because of this physiological insulin resistance (which I should mention is a benign state that is not making your diabetic insulin resistance worse) you wouldn’t want to take an oral glucose tolerance test while you are low carbing.

If you took a glucose tolerance test while on a low carb or ketogenic diet, you would fail. If you need to take such a test (and you want it to be accurate), increase your carbohydrate intake to ~150g for a few days and then take the oral glucose tolerance test. The few days of increased carbohydrate intake will apparently let your body adapt to increased carbohydrate availability and your physiological insulin resistance will go away."
Rosebud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2017, 04:53 PM   #6
Ronnie51
Major LCF Poster!
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 2,056
Gallery: Ronnie51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rosebud View Post
Ronnie51 - was your fasting insulin, fasting glucose and A1c done from the same draw? The reason I ask is if they were done in the same draw, your FI & FG indicate you are insulin sensitive whereas your A1c is prediabetic is an indication of insulin resistance, which is quite the opposite. I plugged your FI & FG numbers into the HOMA-IR calculator at The Blood Code.
Hi Rosebud,
Yes, those numbers are what I usually get when my doctor tests all three at once and represent my last blood test. So, I'm a paradox? The strange thing is, the only factor that points to prediabetes and insulin resistance for me is my A1c. Everything else is normal including my weight (105), lifestyle (lifelong exerciser), fasting glucose and insulin as well as my C-peptide which is 1.0. I did read a study that found that the A1c of non diabetics does rise with age and the cause is speculated to be non glycemic. One possible explanation was that one's rate of glycation changes with age and that would account for the higher A1c. My doctor does have me on Metformin to prevent diabetes, although my numbers are the same as they were before I started taking it. Thank you for looking up my numbers!

Last edited by Ronnie51; 06-01-2017 at 04:54 PM..
Ronnie51 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2017, 05:16 PM   #7
Rosebud
Senior LCF Member
 
Rosebud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: IL
Posts: 370
Gallery: Rosebud
WOE: Ketogenic
Start Date: 1/25/17
Hi Ronnie,

Glad to hear that you are on top of it with your doc. The Blood Code is a great resource for the topic of IR/IS.
Rosebud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2017, 02:47 AM   #8
Avocado
Major LCF Poster!
 
Avocado's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: UK
Posts: 1,077
Gallery: Avocado
Stats: 270/218/202
WOE: LC: Sept 2016
Start Date: Nov 2015
Quote:
Originally Posted by battler View Post
Yes. I posted on indoor blue light not that long ago. Jack Kruse seems to the most vocal on this issue. He believes its the reason many paleo and low carb folk can only get so far with their weight, and why the guy from 'livin low carb' has gained a lot of weight. He believes circadian biology also plays a major part, as well as a lack of sunlight. I personally believe there is something in it and have put in place some of his protocols and have fallen below goal now and can actually see a change in body shape.
Is that true, that there's a natural limit for LC loss? I definitely agree that circadian rhythm has a huge impact on things.
__________________



Avocado is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2017, 06:30 AM   #9
clackley
Chatty Cathy
 
clackley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 13,498
Gallery: clackley
WOE: N.K.=vlc/moderate protein/high fat
Start Date: Restart Oct 18 2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronnie51 View Post
I'll tell you what I know about fasting insulin from reading. First, the normal range of fasting insulin with the major labs like LabCorp is much too high; normal goes up to something like 25. But based on my doctor and articles I've read, anything over 9 or 10 points to insulin resistance or metabolic syndrome. You should not have that much insulin circulating in your blood if you haven't eaten for 12 hours. That much insulin constantly in your bloodstream makes it almost impossible to lose weight. DH has fasting insulin of around 17; the lab says it's normal but our doctor says no. He is overweight, and his A1c is prediabetic as is his fasting glucose (104). The doctor prescribed Metformin for him which really worked to lower his fasting insulin and glucose and his A1c. He even lost a few pounds. But the Metformin upsets his stomach so he stopped taking it, the result being he's gained even more weight, his fasting insulin is back in the teens, his fasting glucose is over 100 again and his A1c is prediabetic. I'm not sure what lowers fasting insulin except for Metformin. I've read that very low carb diets can actually cause insulin resistance. The supplement, Berberine, may be as effective as Metformin based on studies which showed that Berberine acts in the same manner as Metformin in the body. As far as fasting insulin being volatile, I would say that your body releases insulin in response to your liver releasing glucose. So when there's glucose in your blood, the body releases insulin to get that glucose into the cells for energy instead of floating around in your bloodstream. So, if you have a higher fasting glucose, your fasting insulin probably responds in kind. That's about all I know, again, from reading and my doctor. BTW, my fasting insulin is normal (3), my fasting glucose is normal (92), but my A1c is prediabetic (5.7). Doctor's not sure what's happening with me.
The measures here in Canada are different but if I understand correctly, you are right. Here the range is 20 to 240. Quite a broad range! I came in at 45. I believe it is about 7 in US measure. A bit higher than I anticipated. That is why I am so interested in the reliability of fasting insulin testing.

There is a genetic condition in which some people have smaller red blood cells and as a result measure high A1C. Dr. Peter Attia wrote about it as he is one who has it. You may want to look it up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by battler View Post
Yes. I posted on indoor blue light not that long ago. Jack Kruse seems to the most vocal on this issue. He believes its the reason many paleo and low carb folk can only get so far with their weight, and why the guy from 'livin low carb' has gained a lot of weight. He believes circadian biology also plays a major part, as well as a lack of sunlight. I personally believe there is something in it and have put in place some of his protocols and have fallen below goal now and can actually see a change in body shape.
I think you are talking about Jimmy Moore. He did regain some weight (I think it was 70 lbs. on a 6'4" guy). He seems to be having some good results with Fung style fasting. I think that sleep and maybe travel have a negative impact on people. So glad to hear that you found something that worked!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rosebud View Post
Ronnie51 - was your fasting insulin, fasting glucose and A1c done from the same draw? The reason I ask is if they were done in the same draw, your FI & FG indicate you are insulin sensitive whereas your A1c is prediabetic is an indication of insulin resistance, which is quite the opposite. I plugged your FI & FG numbers into the HOMA-IR calculator at The Blood Code.
I only recently discovered HOMA and found it pretty interesting. Good little resource.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rosebud View Post
Forgot to address very low carb diets causing insulin resistance; this is normal and what the body should do. This is referred to as physiological insulin resistance vs pathological insulin resistance as in the case of prediabetics and diabetics. Below is an excerpt that would explain it more:

"After going low carb, your muscle tissue becomes insulin resistant in order to preserve serum glucose availability for the brain. If your muscle tissue did not do this, reduced availability of glucose in the serum could (theoretically) put you in dire straights if your brain can’t meet minimal demand for glucose. (Mind you, even on a zero carb diet you can meet all your glucose requirements via gluconeogenesis. The point is, your body needs a way to tell your muscle mass to stop taking all the glucose it makes. This is that way.)

Because of this physiological insulin resistance (which I should mention is a benign state that is not making your diabetic insulin resistance worse) you wouldn’t want to take an oral glucose tolerance test while you are low carbing.

If you took a glucose tolerance test while on a low carb or ketogenic diet, you would fail. If you need to take such a test (and you want it to be accurate), increase your carbohydrate intake to ~150g for a few days and then take the oral glucose tolerance test. The few days of increased carbohydrate intake will apparently let your body adapt to increased carbohydrate availability and your physiological insulin resistance will go away."

Unfortunate naming issue. It should be something like glucose sparing ratherr than physiological insulin resistance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Avocado View Post
Is that true, that there's a natural limit for LC loss? I definitely agree that circadian rhythm has a huge impact on things.
For some people, it seems that the answer is yes. I have been religiously keto for almost 8 years and really only lost weight in the first year. Dr. Atkins referred to it as the golden shot. It gets harder and harder if a person goes back to eating carbs. I think we become more insulin resistant or maybe it has to do with the type of fat that hangs on. I always think of myself as a Zucker rat - the genetically bred type that will die fat of starvation.
__________________
Cathy
Original start - Feb. 2000 180/125

"The energy content of food (calories) matters, but it is less important than the metabolic effect of food on our body." Dr. P. Attia
“Eat animals. Mostly fat. Enjoy!
"I resist insulin" Hyperlipid
We are butter together!
clackley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2017, 06:39 AM   #10
GME
Big Yapper!!!!
 
GME's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: CA Coast
Posts: 8,451
Gallery: GME
Stats: 250/217/not sure 5'7
WOE: IF/NK
Start Date: April 2000 (the first time)
Battler, which of Jack Kruse's protocals have helped?

I read his book and tried the big breakfast for a while and that was really hard for me. I have never been a breakfast eater, but JK says that means I need to eat it. I also prefer morning exercise and it seems like (if I am remembering right) he suggests evening. His book wasn't bad, but his blog posts and other writings are tough to follow.

I am wondering if leptin is more my issue than insulin. My most recent fasting insulin was 9, which isn't great, but it has tested under 5 several times over the years, while I was still fat. My a1c is always under 5.
__________________
Gina
GME is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2017, 06:40 AM   #11
GME
Big Yapper!!!!
 
GME's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: CA Coast
Posts: 8,451
Gallery: GME
Stats: 250/217/not sure 5'7
WOE: IF/NK
Start Date: April 2000 (the first time)
Maybe I am a Zucker rat too.
__________________
Gina
GME is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2017, 06:44 AM   #12
GME
Big Yapper!!!!
 
GME's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: CA Coast
Posts: 8,451
Gallery: GME
Stats: 250/217/not sure 5'7
WOE: IF/NK
Start Date: April 2000 (the first time)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avocado View Post
Is that true, that there's a natural limit for LC loss? I definitely agree that circadian rhythm has a huge impact on things.
I remember a long time ago, when I was first learning about LC, one of the "big names" (I think it may have been Michael Eades, but I am not sure) saying the longer you have been overweight, the farther you will stay from a normal weight.

I don't remember an explanation, but IR makes sense.
__________________
Gina
GME is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2017, 08:14 AM   #13
Ronnie51
Major LCF Poster!
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 2,056
Gallery: Ronnie51
Cathy, I did look up Peter Attia's genetic condition as suggested by you in another thread. I don't believe that's my situation as one of the conditions is being slightly anemic which I am not. In my case, I think my rbc's may live longer than 90 days, thus more sugar binds with them which causes a higher A1c. Not sure but I hate that doctors place so much emphasis on the A1c, especially when all other markers are normal. Thank you again for the information!
Ronnie51 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2017, 08:50 AM   #14
Rosebud
Senior LCF Member
 
Rosebud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: IL
Posts: 370
Gallery: Rosebud
WOE: Ketogenic
Start Date: 1/25/17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronnie51 View Post
In my case, I think my rbc's may live longer than 90 days, thus more sugar binds with them which causes a higher A1c.
That may be it, Ronnie. I remember my doctor a while back saying something to that effect of the life span of blood cells and the glycation relative to A1c. My recent A1c is 5.

Last edited by Rosebud; 06-02-2017 at 08:52 AM..
Rosebud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2017, 08:55 AM   #15
Ronnie51
Major LCF Poster!
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 2,056
Gallery: Ronnie51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rosebud View Post
That may be it, Ronnie. I remember my doctor a while back saying something to that effect of the life span of blood cells and the glycation relative to A1c. My recent A1c is 5.
You have a beautiful A1c, Rosebud! I think I may have had that value when I was ten.
Ronnie51 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2017, 08:56 AM   #16
clackley
Chatty Cathy
 
clackley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 13,498
Gallery: clackley
WOE: N.K.=vlc/moderate protein/high fat
Start Date: Restart Oct 18 2009
Glad to have been of a little help. It makes sense that the life of the red blood cells can be longer. All labs are based on averages and as we all know, many of us are outliers!
__________________
Cathy
Original start - Feb. 2000 180/125

"The energy content of food (calories) matters, but it is less important than the metabolic effect of food on our body." Dr. P. Attia
“Eat animals. Mostly fat. Enjoy!
"I resist insulin" Hyperlipid
We are butter together!
clackley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2017, 09:00 AM   #17
Rosebud
Senior LCF Member
 
Rosebud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: IL
Posts: 370
Gallery: Rosebud
WOE: Ketogenic
Start Date: 1/25/17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronnie51 View Post
You have a beautiful A1c, Rosebud! I think I may have had that value when I was ten.
Thanks, Ronnie!
Rosebud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2017, 03:09 PM   #18
battler
Senior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 357
Gallery: battler
Quote:
Originally Posted by GME View Post
Battler, which of Jack Kruse's protocals have helped?

I read his book and tried the big breakfast for a while and that was really hard for me. I have never been a breakfast eater, but JK says that means I need to eat it. I also prefer morning exercise and it seems like (if I am remembering right) he suggests evening. His book wasn't bad, but his blog posts and other writings are tough to follow.

I am wondering if leptin is more my issue than insulin. My most recent fasting insulin was 9, which isn't great, but it has tested under 5 several times over the years, while I was still fat. My a1c is always under 5.
I eat a big breakfast and small dinner during daylight hours, - so dinner before sunset and breakfast at or after sunrise.

Eating in season only with lots of seafood

Looking towards the sun when I can to help with circadian rhythmn

Got blue blockers for evening

Reverted back to incandescent bulbs

I am not using the heating during the day only evenings and wearing summer clothing during the day (its winter here now and I believe this is the thing that has kicked off weight loss)

I no longer record food, count calories, steps etc.
battler is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2017, 03:37 PM   #19
battler
Senior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 357
Gallery: battler
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avocado View Post
Is that true, that there's a natural limit for LC loss? I definitely agree that circadian rhythm has a huge impact on things.
I believe it to be true for most people including me. I think sometimes you see amazing transformations by people who converted to LCHF way of eating, the default thought is always about what they eat. I think we may need to consider these people may sleep better, have better Vit D levels, spend more time in the natural environment, have a better balance of hormones etc. The people themselves who has lost the weight probably thinks its all about food as well.

As I keep learning and trying things, the more and more I am coming to the conclusion that lifestyles and environment are key as well.
battler is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2017, 04:15 PM   #20
GME
Big Yapper!!!!
 
GME's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: CA Coast
Posts: 8,451
Gallery: GME
Stats: 250/217/not sure 5'7
WOE: IF/NK
Start Date: April 2000 (the first time)
Quote:
Originally Posted by battler View Post
I eat a big breakfast and small dinner during daylight hours, - so dinner before sunset and breakfast at or after sunrise.

Eating in season only with lots of seafood

Looking towards the sun when I can to help with circadian rhythmn

Got blue blockers for evening

Reverted back to incandescent bulbs

I am not using the heating during the day only evenings and wearing summer clothing during the day (its winter here now and I believe this is the thing that has kicked off weight loss)

I no longer record food, count calories, steps etc.
Thanks
__________________
Gina
GME is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2017, 09:19 AM   #21
ChelePA
Senior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 290
Gallery: ChelePA
Just had my yearly test. Fasting insulin was 3.0. A1C 5.2. Last year fasting insulin was 2.5 and A1C was 5.3.
ChelePA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2017, 09:22 AM   #22
Ronnie51
Major LCF Poster!
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 2,056
Gallery: Ronnie51
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChelePA View Post
Just had my yearly test. Fasting insulin was 3.0. A1C 5.2. Last year fasting insulin was 2.5 and A1C was 5.3.
Great numbers!
Ronnie51 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2017, 10:42 AM   #23
ChelePA
Senior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 290
Gallery: ChelePA
Just had my yearly test. Fasting insulin was 3.0. A1C 5.2. Last year fasting insulin was 2.5 and A1C was 5.3.
ChelePA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2017, 06:31 AM   #24
GME
Big Yapper!!!!
 
GME's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: CA Coast
Posts: 8,451
Gallery: GME
Stats: 250/217/not sure 5'7
WOE: IF/NK
Start Date: April 2000 (the first time)
I thought I would bring this post back up to post my latest results. I had the tests run about 10 days ago and got the results yesterday.

My a1c is 4.5, my insulin is 10, and fasting bg was 90.

I plugged my numbers into the HOMA IR calculator and got 2.2, which they classify as "early insulin resistance."

I eat low-ish carb (nowhere near SAD, but higher than the usual low carber), and IF daily. 2-3 times per week I will do OMAD, and the other days a 6-8 hour window. I could lower my carbs, but I find that really difficult anymore since I found out I have intolerances to all dairy and eggs. Intellectually, keto sounds great, and I get myself all psyched up to try it preiodically, but I just feel draggier and draggier and get all kinds of depravation thoughts until I give up.

My exercise of choice is long, slow endurance-type stuff, which is supposed to be good for burning fat. I enjoy it, but don't seem to be burning much fat. Or maybe I am and would be much fatter with worse numbers without it.

My next thing to try will be to change up my exercise routine so I recently started a pretty intense class that mixes HIIT with weight lifting- both of which are supposed to be good for IR. I also started doing yoga, which has been great for relxation and flexibility, but I don't know if it helps with IR.

That's my latest.
__________________
Gina
GME is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2017, 07:43 AM   #25
Ronnie51
Major LCF Poster!
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 2,056
Gallery: Ronnie51
I never heard of that model so I found it online and punched in my numbers and received an optimal result of 0.5. However, my A1c is prediabetic, last time it was 5.8, and I need to watch my carb intake and I take Metformin to prevent diabetes. So, I guess my problem is not insulin resistance, but that I don't produce enough insulin? My fasting insulin varies between 2 - 4, which didn't change after I started taking Metformin. I really don't think Metformin is doing anything for me and it may be because I'm not insulin resistant.
Ronnie51 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2017, 08:24 AM   #26
Leo41
Senior LCF member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 4,912
Gallery: Leo41
Stats: 340 then/145 now
WOE: Low carb/calorie cycling
Ronnie-

I am no doctor but am concerned that you are being 'treated' as pre-diabetic based on your A1C, which, as has been pointed out, can be inaccurate for some people.

When my last endo wanted to absolutely confirm that I was not diabetic, she had me take a Glucose Tolerance Test which, I've been told, accurately measures how well your body deals with sugar. It is considered definitive for any diagnosis of diabetes. Since I normally eat very low carb, I had to eat at least 150g carbs for 3 days prior to the test in order for it to be accurate, but it was definitely worth it to confirm that I'm not diabetic and that my A1C is accurate.

I would think a GTT might either confirm or deny your A1C readings, and that might be useful for you.
Leo41 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2017, 08:53 AM   #27
Ronnie51
Major LCF Poster!
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 2,056
Gallery: Ronnie51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leo41 View Post
Ronnie-

I am no doctor but am concerned that you are being 'treated' as pre-diabetic based on your A1C, which, as has been pointed out, can be inaccurate for some people.

When my last endo wanted to absolutely confirm that I was not diabetic, she had me take a Glucose Tolerance Test which, I've been told, accurately measures how well your body deals with sugar. It is considered definitive for any diagnosis of diabetes. Since I normally eat very low carb, I had to eat at least 150g carbs for 3 days prior to the test in order for it to be accurate, but it was definitely worth it to confirm that I'm not diabetic and that my A1C is accurate.

I would think a GTT might either confirm or deny your A1C readings, and that might be useful for you.
Hi Leo, thank you for pointing that out and at one time I did agree with you until I recently did my own unplanned GTT test which I failed miserably. Because my prior A1c had been 5.5 after I had relaxed my diet, I became very complacent, so much so that I ate pancakes for breakfast one morning at the diner, a food that I had eliminated from my diet. I ate three delicious pancakes, not small, with sugar free maple syrup that added only about 3 carbs. I actually thought about only eating two pancakes, but I was a glutton . About an hour after we got home from the diner I wanted to see how high I had spiked, and I was not prepared for the result. I was in diabetic territory, scary high. I was upset, but I thought that since pancakes are simple carbs, my sugar would come down by the second hour. Nope, still high. Came down a bit after three hours. Was a lot better at four hours. That showed me that I do have a problem processing carbs and while my diet is not as strict was it was before, I am again being more diligent with carbs. I just wonder if my very high spike could have been inaccurate because of what your doctor told you, i.e., prepare for the test by increasing your carbs to 150g for three days. I hadn't done that, so I went from lowish carb (around 50 g per day) to I'm guessing those pancakes had at least 30g carbs each, so 90 carbs in one sitting, throwing my body into shock. In any event, it sobered me up as far as getting back on the lower carb bandwagon. My A1c a couple of weeks after eating those pancakes was 5.8, up from 5.5.
Ronnie51 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2017, 08:59 AM   #28
DiamondDeb
Fat Burning Machine Extraordinaire!
 
DiamondDeb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 10,717
Gallery: DiamondDeb
Stats: 150+ lbs lost
Ronnie, I suspect your only problem is that the testing is not accurate for you - as mentioned earlier in this thread. The problem is in the lab test, not your body. You may need an A1c that tests over a longer period of time than the current ones do.

I find it puzzling that some in this thread have great, low (under 5) A1c results and yet have higher fasting insulin, while others have higher A1c results than I would expect with an optimal (3) fasting insulin. I would expect both numbers to be optimal, not one or the other. I'm all about "why" with absolutely everything so I would love to understand this. With a higher A1c, it could be the length of time used in testing needs to be longer (maybe 4-5 months) but that doesn't explain the higher fasting insulin with a low A1c.
__________________
Living by Faith

To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven
King James Version (KJV), Ecclesiastes 3:1
DiamondDeb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2017, 09:16 AM   #29
GME
Big Yapper!!!!
 
GME's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: CA Coast
Posts: 8,451
Gallery: GME
Stats: 250/217/not sure 5'7
WOE: IF/NK
Start Date: April 2000 (the first time)
I have read how some people have long-lived red blood cells, making their a1c higher. I sometimes wonder if I have short-lived red blood cells, thereby not giving them as much time to have whatever it is they measure in an a1c attach, keeping it lower.

I have tested my own BS a few times, and have fasting BG tested every 6 months or so. It is often in the 80s and 90s, which is creeping up there. It seems like my a1c should be higher. Maybe I don't get high spikes, making the average stay low. The lab results say and a1c of 4.5 (my latest) translates into an average BG of of 83. How can that be when my morning fasting is 90? Dawn phenomenon I guess, and it must dip later in the day. I have a monitor, I should do more testing.
__________________
Gina
GME is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2017, 09:19 AM   #30
GME
Big Yapper!!!!
 
GME's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: CA Coast
Posts: 8,451
Gallery: GME
Stats: 250/217/not sure 5'7
WOE: IF/NK
Start Date: April 2000 (the first time)
Ronnie, I agree with Leo, I think you should have a real GTT that you have prepared for. Then you can know what is going on, rather than wonder and worry.
__________________
Gina
GME is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 11:49 PM.


Copyright ©1999-2017 Netrition, Inc. All rights reserved. - Terms of Service | Privacy Policy
LowCarbFriends® is a registered mark of Netrition, Inc.